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Oregon passes Student Assessment Bill of Rights

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From the Oregon Education Association:

On June 11, the Oregon Senate passed HB 2655, the Student Assessment Bill of Rights. The Bill recognizes students and their parents as important stakeholders in the assessment process and improves transparency around the assessment process for students and educators. This bill also establishes one of the most parent friendly opt-out bills in the nation, ensuring that every parent has access to information about the statewide assessments and how to exercise the right to determine if sitting for the statewide standardized assessment is in the best interest of their child. More importantly, the legislation brings us one step closer to our ultimate goal–a system where parents, students and teachers are “all-in” instead of wanting to “opt-out.”

To recognize this important victory for our students and parents, OEA President Hanna Vaandering issued the following statement:

“As educators, we know the consequence of over-testing—put simply, it takes the love of learning out of our schools.  We are proud that the Oregon legislature took one of the strongest steps in the nation toward protecting students and students’ rights as they relate to statewide standardized assessments.  But this is just one step on our path toward a better way.

“Assessments should inspire learning. Our ultimate goal is to work with state leaders to create a system of assessment that works for all students, parents and educators—one that accurately measures student learning and growth without creating undo anxiety and stress.  When all is said and done, we want parents and students to be all-in, not opt-out.  That’s what we’re striving for, and I know we will get there soon. 

“In the meantime, this legislation is an important step.  OEA members—in partnership with parents and students—reached out to lawmakers, and lawmakers listened.  This is how the process is supposed to work. Today I’m proud to be an educator and an Oregonian.”

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